mapping

Updated Idaho Topo Maps Available & Using the TerraGo Toolbar

The Idaho 2013/2014 series of US Topo maps have been completed. The latest series has improvements over the 2011 series including Forest service roads and trails, structures, improved NHD, PLSS, and more. The image base for the new maps is the 2013 NAIP. GeoPDF maps can be downloaded FREE of charge at the USGS Map Store.

A GeoPDF is "an extension to Adobe's PDF 1.3 and higher versions enabling GIS functionality within standard PDF files." For more information about GeoPDF's click here. In these GeoPDFs you can toggle the layers (geographic names, boundaries, transportation, hydrography, contours, imagery) on/off.  You can also use the Search tool to look for specific named places on the map,

You can also download the FREE TerraGO Toolbar to access geospatial maps and imagery, measure distance and area, display/find coordinates, add "GeoStamps", and capture GPS information. For more information about TerraGo and to watch Training Videos, visit their website http://www.terragotech.com/products/field-data-collection/terrago-toolbar.

Here is an example of what a GeoPDF with the TerraGo toolbar add-in.  You can toggle map layers on/off in the left-hand "Layers" table of contents.  The TerraGo toolbars can be enabled in through the main menu or by going to View > Extended > TerraGo GeoPDF or TerraGo GeoMark.

Create a Buffer for a KML in Google Earth

Create a user-defined buffer around point, line, or polygon KMLs has never been easier!

1) Make sure that your Google Earth data is saved as a KML, not KMZ

2) Open this website: http://www.geo-news.net/index_buffer.php

          

3) Select your buffer type (line, point, or polygon)

4) Select the KML you would like to buffer and choose a buffer distance (in meters). Click the globe with the up arrow to upload your KML file.

                                    

5) A new KML will be created and available via a link at the top of the screen.

            

6) Click the link, save the KML to a location of your choosing and open in Google Earth!

Geospatial PDF?!? How to Create a Geospatially Aware PDF

 

Yes, it is true!  You can make a PDF map spatially aware (aka georeferenced).  Geospatial PDF’s allow users to obtain latitude and longitude coordinates, turn data layers on and off, view a selected features attributes, and to query and highlight data.  This tutorial will explain how you create a spatially aware PDF map from ESRI ArcMap.  Just follow these easy steps!

1) Obtain the latest version of Adobe Reader (for free) at: http://get.adobe.com/reader/. NOTE: This tutorial uses Adobe Reader 10 so if you are using a later or newer version, some of the menus, etc. may be different.

2) Once you have created your map in ArcMap, select Export Map… from the File menu. Choose PDF from the ‘Save as type:” dialog box. If it is not already expanded, expand the Options menu at the bottom of the Export Map dialog box. Select the Advanced tab.  In the Layers and Attributes drop-down menu select ‘Export PDF Layers and Feature Attributes’. Also check the box in front of ‘Export Map Georeference Information’. 

 

3) Open your exported map in Adobe Reader.  Add the Model Tree to the Navigation Pane running down the left side of the Reader by right-clicking the panel.

 

4) Start exploring! 

 

 

TOGGLE LAYERS ON & OFF

Click on the Layers icon in the Navigation Panel.

 

 

You can turn layers/labels on or off by clicking the Eye icon to the left of a group of or individual layers.

 

VIEW ATTRIBUTE DATA

Click on the Model Tree icon in the Navigation Panel.

 

Select a feature from the list to see its attributes (NOTE: These are the same attributes that appear in the attribute tables in ArcMap. If there is a field that is turned off in your ArcMap attribute table, it will also not appear in the PDF). The feature will also be highlighted in the map.

 

You can also select a feature with your mouse on the map to view its attributes in the Model tree. To do so, you must have the Object Data tool on. To turn this tool on: from the Edit menu, select Analysis, and then Object Data Tool.

 

Finally, using the Find tool is also a simple way to query for data.  Simply type the name of the feature into the Find tool or Advanced Search search box.  If there is more than one feature that meets the criteria, it will be listed on the screen.  To see the attributes of a specific feature, select it from the search results list.

 

FIND LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE COORDINATES

To turn this tool on: from the Edit menu, select Analysis, and then Geospatial Location Tool. The location of the cursor while be shown in a text box at the bottom of the screen.

 

HELPFUL FACTS AND TIPS FROM THE ArcGIS RESOURCES WEBPAGE

http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#/Exporting_to_PDF/00sm00000007000000/

· Each data frame will have its own folder in the tree view of the PDF that contains all the layers and the data frame graphics (neatline, background) associated with it.

· Text, picture, or north arrow elements added to a layout become part of a layer called Other. It contains all the graphics and marginalia that are not part of a data frame.

· Each group layer will be represented as a folder in the tree view, and the contents of the group layer will be presented within the group layer.

· Layers that cause rasterization, such as transparent layers, or layers that use a picture fill symbology consolidate all the layers below them into a single layer with the name Image.

· If a layer contains picture marker or picture fill symbology, use the option Vectorize picture markers/fills, found on the Format tab of the Options panel. This prevents rasterization of layers below picture markers and fills.

· Raster layers, such as orthophotos, consolidate all layers below them into a single Image layer. Place raster layers lower in the ArcMap table of contents to avoid this problem.

· Graphic or text elements added to the data frame's default graphics layer from data view become a layer called <Default>. These are displayed above the layers in the data frame. If multiple annotation groups exist (check this on the Drawing > Active Annotation Target menu command on the Draw toolbar) and their contents are in the data view, each individual annotation group becomes a separate layer above the <Default> layer. This is a good way to add focus areas or graphics that emphasize or mask certain features in the data view.

· Backgrounds or drop shadows added to the data frame may become separate graphic elements and may be rendered multiple times as graphics. For example, if a data frame has a colored background, and the layout has a different colored background, the data frame's background may be rendered once to the data frame's Graphics or ArcGIS Layer and again to the layout's Graphics layer or ArcGIS Layer.

· Dynamic labels (not using annotation) in each data frame are rendered separately as part of a layer called Labels.

· Geodatabase annotation is displayed as a separate layer in the PDF. Map annotation is consolidated into the layer for the annotation group in which it belongs.

· When labels are converted to annotation, they are automatically placed in their own named annotation group and render separately from the<Default> group.

· Data frames and other layout elements are rendered in draw order when exported to PDF. Therefore, the topmost layout element in the map is the first element in the resultant PDF table of contents. Use the Bring Forward and Send Backward commands from the Draw toolbar to change the draw order of layout elements.

ENJOY!!!

Stream not found in new mapping function of SSS

On Oct. 27, I attempted to create a new survey site in SSS.  Using old NAD27 coordinates, the mapping function created a map of the area with the survey site identified.  However, since the survey was on an unnamed side channel west of the main Salmon River, the mapping function returned the following message: "Stream not found."

UTM coordinates are NAD27, 723825 E, 4936021 N

On the survey datasheet, Tom Curet called this site "Pennal Slough" as the site is across the river from Pennal Gulch.

Please advise how to get this site named for SSS data entry.  Thanks - Marsha

Shapefile to Google Earth kml - Customize Symbol Properties and Labeling (NO PROGRAMMING REQUIRED!)

Although there is a tool in ArcToolbox (Layer to KML) that allows you to convert your ArcGIS file to a Google Earth KML file, this tool gives you no options for customizing how the information is displayed.

Let me present to you the opensource (aka FREE) Shp2kml tool:

http://www.zonums.com/shp2kml.html

Note:  The Download link is actually half way down the webpage, the large Start Download button at the top of the page is part of an ad for a different product.

Step 1:  Choose your input file and coordinate system.

Step 2: Decide which attribute you want to use as the label and check 'Mouse Roll over Effect' if you want to highlight a feature when the mouse is moved over it.

Step 3: Decide what color and transparency (opacity) you features will be.

Step 4: Decide what attribute information you would like in the pop-up balloon when a feature is clicked or selected and customize the balloons symbology.

Step 5: Give the kml layer a name and any descriptive information you would like and your done!

BRILLIANT!

 

 

Don't like ArcGIS 10 Metadata Editor? Download the FGDC Metadata Editor add-in (just like in 9.x)

Download Page for the FGDC Metadata Editor add-in (Direct Download Link to Add-in). Thanks Michelle H. for the link update!

Option #1

  1. Download and save the attached file (fgdc.esriaddin) to your ArcGIS Desktop add-in folder (C:\Users\...\Documents\ArcGIS\AddIns\Desktop10.0)
  2. Open ArcCatalog (if open, close and re-open)
  3. In ArcCatalog go to the Customize menu and select Customize Mode
  4. On the Commands tab scroll down to the Metadata category
  5. From the Metadata Commands, drag the Show Metadata Editor command to the Metadata toolbar or someplace on the users interface to access the FGDC Editor.
Option #2 (works for if you don't have the C:\Users\...\Documents\ArcGIS\AddIns\Desktop10.0 setup)
  1. Download and save the attached file to wherever you want (I like to save this kind of stuff in the Downloads folder).
  2. Open ArcCatalog.
  3. In ArcCatalog go to the Customize menu and select Customize Mode.
  4. On the Commands tab scroll down to the Metadata category and select it.
  5. click the Add from file... button at the bottom of the window and navigate to and open the fgdc.esriaddin file you downloaded.
  6. From the Metadata Commands, drag the Show Metadata Editor command to the Metadata toolbar or someplace on the users interface to access the FGDC Editor.
Note: If the add-in does not automatically show up in the Metadata Commands list close the Customize window then reopen it and drag to the Metadata toolbar.

If you created metadata using the FGDC metadata editor in ArcGIS Desktop 9.3.1 or the FGDC metadata editor add-in, this content is visible under the FGDC Metadata heading in the Description tab. You can export and validate this content using the USGS MP Metadata Translator tool.

 

Multi-line & Multi-colored Labels in ArcMap

Right-click the layer you would like to create multicolor/multi-line, choose Properties… and go to the Labels tab, and click the “Expression…” button.

For example, to have the New ID on top and the Old ID on the bottom:

[New_ID]&vbnewline&[Old_ID]

To have each a different color:

“<CLR Red=’255′>” & [New_ID] & “</CLR>” &vbnewline&”<CLR blue=’255′>”&[Old_ID]&”</CLR>”

The tricky part was figuring out that you had to put double quotes around the formatted text, and drop the normal double quote down to a single quote around the 255.

 

Create a Circular ArcMap Data Frame

Ever wished you could create a circular data frame to highlight an area on your map?  Just follow these steps:

  1. In the data frame properties (Size and Position Tab) make the height and width the same.                           

  2. In the data frame properties (Frame Tab) ►Border Section change the Rounding to 100% ► Background Section change the Rounding to 100%.

Violá!                      

         

Revert Back to the ArcMap 9.3 Editing Environment in ArcMap 10

By default, the ArcMap editing environment uses feature templates and the Create Features window when adding new features. Feature templates define all the information required to create a new feature: the layer where a feature will be stored, attributes new features will be created with, and the default tool used to create that feature. In addition, the tools on the Editor and Topology toolbars contain easy-to-use tools to create and edit features.

Due to the usability benefits that feature templates provide, it is recommended that you learn to use them when editing. However, for organizations that are unable to adopt the template-based workflow, there is an option available to revert to the ArcGIS 9 editing environment. This allows organizations that rely on extensive editing customizations to transition at their own pace to the feature template workflow. You can return to using feature templates once you are ready to migrate to that workflow. You can revert by running ArcGIS\Desktop10.0\Utilities \AdvancedArcMapSettings.exe, clicking the Editor tab, and unchecking Create features using templates and restarting ArcMap.

Differences between the 9.3 and 10 editing environments

The following are some of the differences you will find when you revert to the ArcGIS 9 editing environment:

  • The Editor toolbar contains the Sketch tool and palette. The contents of the toolbar are returned to how they appeared in ArcGIS 9.
  • Any user interface element used with feature templates, such as the Create Features window, is removed from ArcMap.
  • Edit tasks are used to specify whether features are being created or edited. The Cut Polygons, Reshape Feature, Edit Vertices, Reshape Edge, and Modify Edge tools are removed from the Editor and Topology toolbars, and the Editor toolbar Task list is used to access that functionality.
  • The active layer in the Target drop-down list is the layer in which new features will be created. The exception is when using Copy and Paste and certain feature-creation commands—Buffer, Copy Parallel, Union, and so on. In those cases, a dialog box will appear allowing you to choose the target layer rather than requiring you to set the Target layer on the Editor toolbar prior to accessing the command.
  • The Annotation toolbar and Dimension toolbar contain the tools used to create those feature types.

Batching - Running Geoprocessing Tools Multiple Times Automatically

Let’s say you have a polygon shapefile that you want to buffer using 3 different buffer distances.  You can use the Batch command to do this automatically; you just have to fill in the necessary information. (Note: Batch can be performed for any tool in ArcToolbox).

o   Find the Buffer tool in ArcToolbox, right click it and choose Batch… The dialog box will ask you for all of the same information that the regular Buffer tool dialog box asks for, the only differences is you can make multiple entries by clicking the  button.