iis

Upload Limits in Drupal/IIS

Modifying your php.ini settings to the following will allow increased file upload limits:

  • upload_max_filesize = 50M
  • post_max_size = 50M

However, if you are using Internet Information Server (IIS), also check that there isn't a requestLimit set in the web.config. Drupal will show that a larger size is allowed via php.ini, but large files won't upload.

Here is the setting to change, on my system it defaulted to 10mbs:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<configuration>
  <system.webServer>
...
    <security>
<requestFiltering>
            <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="10485760" />
        </requestFiltering>
    </security>
...
  </system.webServer>
</configuration>

Changed maxAllowedContentLength to 52428800 and 50mb uploads worked immediately.

Fix for PDFs failing to download or downloading sporadically

 

Problem: PDFs downloaded from your website do not load on most client machines. Specifically happens with larger PDF files and sporadically happens across browser clients.   

Atmosphere: Windows Server 2008 R2 running IIS7.5

Cause: According to this lengthy forum post, Windows Server 2008 changes the byte order for downloaded files that Adobe reader didn't know how to read.

Solution: Apply the Windows hotfix #KB979543. Reboot required.

 

 

Enable Cross-Origin Resource Sharing to Allow Cross-Site JSON

We just discovered our open data wasn't nearly as open as we believed.  Turns out for true cross-site requests of JSON data you need to add a HTTP Reponse Header:

 Access-Control-Allow-Origin: "*"

The method one uses to do so vary widely by webserver and host.  In our case, for IIS7 the simplest method was to configure it in the web.config:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
  <system.webServer>
    <httpProtocol>
      <customHeaders>
        <add name="Access-Control-Allow-Origin" value="*" />
      </customHeaders>
    </httpProtocol>
  </system.webServer>
</configuration>

For more information on the why and how as well as directions for other webservers visit enable-cors.org. The folks behind hacks.mozilla.org also offer a solid overview of Cross-site XmlHttpRequest with CORS.  Use the form at http://enable-cors.org/#check to see if your site is CORS enabled.

At this time only IFWIS Core is CORS-Enabled on IDFG's website.

Simple HTTP Redirect with Querystring in IIS7

 

HTTP Redirect seems simple enough. Always was in IIS6 and in IIS7 there's even a button labeled HTTP Redirect that promises relative redirects.  It looks like it'll be as easy Apache finally.  That is until you try to redirect a querystring.  Then everything bombs.

Turns out it still is relatively easy, except you have to know that Microsoft changed $S$Q to $V$Q. Why? $Ss and $Gs I suspect.

And How.
In our example we'll redirect all pages under http://olddomain.com/content to http://mydomain.com/content.



  1. Pick the virtual directory you want to redirect. e.g. http://olddomain.com/content
  2. Click HTTP Redirect under IIS in the IIS management console.
  3. In the HTTP Redirect Dialog:
    • Check Redirect requests to this destination
    • Enter your new path ending with $V$Q.  e.g. http://mydomain.com$V$Q
    • Counter-intuitively check Redirect all request to exact destination (instead of relative destination)
    • Choose the appropriate Status Code (Permanent or Temporary)
  4. Apply Changes and Test