gis

GIS - MORE, Better, Faster

We have implemented a system of distributed, synchronized GIS databases across the state.  This should substantially increase the speed with which you can access and navigate GIS data in ArcMap.

There is now a copy of our GIS layers stored on the U:\ drive in each regional office as well as for Nampa Research and Eagle Lab.  The database, U:\GIS_IDFG.gdb will be synchronized nightly with the main database at HQ.

We have also added a directory of Layerfiles to the U:\ drive.  The directory is located at U:\IDFG_Layers.   The Layerfiles reference the data in U:\GIS_IDFG.gdb and provide predefined colors, symbols, and labeling.  You may add them to your map document through ArcCatalog, the AddData button, or the LayerFetcher.

Some of the Layerfiles, such as the aerial imagery and topo base maps, point to data that is delivered via the internet.  The speed at which these layers draw will depend on the speed of the internet connection at your regional office.  You can navigate around your map more quickly if you keep these layers turned off until you need them. The internet base map layers are located in the WebBaseMaps subdirectory of IDFG_Layers.

Other subdirectories include Hunt, Fish, Conservation, and Reference.  Go in to ArcCatalog and take a look around in U:\IDFG_Layers and U:\GIS_IDFG.gdb to see what’s available.

This should be a significant improvement for IDFG GIS users but there will be some pain.  Many of the data connections in your existing Map Documents may be broken.  This is actually a good thing.  It will encourage you to connect to the newer, better, faster data.

If you find a broken connection in your map:

Right-click the layer in your map project.

Select Data --> Repair Data Source --> Navigate to U:\ GIS_IDFG.gdb and select the equivalent layer - OR - use the LayerFetcher to add the new layer and remove the old one.

See this post on repairing broken data sources for a visual step-by-step and more options for fixing broken connections.

Thank you for your patience during this transition.

Repairing Broken Data Sources cont. & connecting to U:\GIS_IDFG.gdb

The IFWIS shop has migrated all of our most useful GIS data to new geodatabases that will live in each region.  What does that mean?  That means that your GIS projects should be much faster to build and work with because regional users will be requesting data from a local geodatabase instead of a geodatabase sitting at headquarters.  The layers in the LayerFetcher tool are now all referencing the new geodatabase.  Within each region, the geodatabase is located at U:\GIS_IDFG.gdb.  Instead of referencing K:\IFWIS\SDE_Layers\SDE_Vector.sde to repair broken data sources, you should reference U:\GIS_IDFG.gdb.

To elaborate a little on the original 'Repairing Broken Data Sources' blog post, you can also repair multiple broken data sources in ArcMap.

In ArcMap, right-click a layer with a broken data source --> Data --> Repair Data Source...

Navigate to the U drive:

If you don't see the U drive in your Data Source directory, you need to make a new connection.  In the Data Source dialog, click the 'Connect to Folder' icon and navigate to the U drive.  In the GIS_IDFG.gdb, navigate to the corresponding feature class.  For instance, if you are repairing the 'Major Rivers' layer, navigate to 'Hydro_Stream_Idaho'. How did I know which feature class to navigate to?  You can figure out the name of the feature class you are looking for by looking at the 'Source' tab of the 'Layer Properties' window of the broken layer.

‘Repair Data Source’ may repair multiple layers if the matching feature class in the new geodatabase has the same name.  For instance, the wilderness areas layer will not be repaired because the original feature class used to created the layer was called ‘wilderness’ and the new feature class is called ‘wilderness areas’.

After a data source has been repaired you may receive drawing errors such as:

What do all those errors mean?!?  While we were creating the new GIS_IDFG.gdb for the regions, we thought it was also a good opportunity to update some of the data.  Consequently, some of the field names have changed.  So, after the data source is repaired old definition queries and label expression may cause the layer or its labels to not draw.  You have two options, you can edit the definition queries and label expressions using the proper field names OR you can remove the layer entirely and re-add the layer using the LayerFetcher.  

Here are a couple of examples of errors cause by legacy queries and expressions and how to fix them. 

The 'Hydrography (Idaho Only), Major Rivers' layer has a definition query of 

In the new 'Hydro_Stream_Idaho' feature class the length field is called Shape_Length and the LLID fields is a text field instead of a numeric field.  The definition query must now read Shape_Length > 50000 OR LLID = '1149345461224'.

The 'Geographic Names (w/o Hydro)' layer has a definition query of TYPE <> 'lake' AND TYPE <> 'reservoir' AND TYPE <> 'stream'.  In the new GNIS feature class, the type field is now called 'class'.

The label expression for the geographic names layer is [NAME].  In the new GNIS feature class, the name field is called 'Feature_Na'.

 

 

 

 

 

GIS training, free courses, blogs and other resources

You have brains in your head.  You have feet in your shoes.  You can steer yourself any direction you choose!  (Dr. Seuss, of course)  Wondering where to start with GIS?  Maybe you're looking for a few tips and tricks from other users -- or maybe a course to brush up on your understanding of spatial data or widen your professional horizons.  In a world where GIS is everwhere, the choices can seem overwhelming.  Here's a sampler to help you navigate.

Entry level to intermediate courses:

https://fishandgame.idaho.gov/ifwis/portal/sites/ifwis/files/user/idfg-ccoulter/GIScourses_Esri_Spring2015.xlsx

Of interest to any level GIS user:

INFO / BLOGS / LINKS

http://www.magip.org/Training

http://gis.stackexchange.com/questions/17227/free-gis-workshops-tutorials-and-applied-learning-material

http://www.gislounge.com/learning-gis-resources-for-gis-training/

http://www.gislounge.com/gis-distance-learning/

http://education-portal.com/articles/List_of_Free_Online_Geography_Courses_and_Educational_Materials.html

http://wiki.gis.com/wiki/index.php/List_of_GIS-related_Blogs

TRAINING / INVOLVEMENT

http://giscenter.isu.edu/

http://www.junipergis.com/training/

http://www.nwgis.org/

http://www.urisa.org/

https://vimeo.com/geospatialtraining

http://www.geospatialtraining.com/

http://learninggis.com/our-classes/gis-training-online

http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/maps/gis/tutorials.cfm

http://www.gis247.com/

http://open.ems.psu.edu/courseware

http://ocw.tufts.edu/Course/74

https://mangomap.com/

Happy Mapping from the GIS Team in IFWIS!

Controlled Hunt Areas 2015 - Sheep

24k version of Idaho Fish & Game's 2015 Bighorn Sheep Controlled Hunt Areas.

Controlled hunt is a term used to describe a hunt with a limited number of permits, as opposed to a general season, which allows unlimited numbers of hunters. Controlled hunts are often desirable because of location and/or timing. Success rates are usually higher in controlled hunts than general season hunts. For more information visit the following websites:

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/controlledHunts/

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/hunt/rules/

Controlled Hunt Areas 2015 - Moose

24k version of Idaho Fish & Game's 2015 Moose Controlled Hunt Areas.

Controlled hunt is a term used to describe a hunt with a limited number of permits, as opposed to a general season, which allows unlimited numbers of hunters. Controlled hunts are often desirable because of location and/or timing. Success rates are usually higher in controlled hunts than general season hunts. For more information visit the following websites:

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/controlledHunts/

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/hunt/rules/

Controlled Hunt Areas 2015 - Goat

24k version of Idaho Fish & Game's 2015 Mountain Goat Controlled Hunt Areas.

Controlled hunt is a term used to describe a hunt with a limited number of permits, as opposed to a general season, which allows unlimited numbers of hunters. Controlled hunts are often desirable because of location and/or timing. Success rates are usually higher in controlled hunts than general season hunts. For more information visit the following websites:

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/controlledHunts/

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/hunt/rules/

Controlled Hunt Areas 2014 - Sheep

24k version of Idaho Fish & Game's 2014 Bighorn Sheep Controlled Hunt Areas.

Controlled hunt is a term used to describe a hunt with a limited number of permits, as opposed to a general season, which allows unlimited numbers of hunters. Controlled hunts are often desirable because of location and/or timing. Success rates are usually higher in controlled hunts than general season hunts. For more information visit the following websites:

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/controlledHunts/

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/hunt/rules/

Controlled Hunt Areas 2014 - Moose

24k version of Idaho Fish & Game's 2014 Moose Controlled Hunt Areas.

Controlled hunt is a term used to describe a hunt with a limited number of permits, as opposed to a general season, which allows unlimited numbers of hunters. Controlled hunts are often desirable because of location and/or timing. Success rates are usually higher in controlled hunts than general season hunts. For more information visit the following websites:

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/controlledHunts/

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/hunt/rules/

Controlled Hunt Areas 2014 - Goat

24k version of Idaho Fish & Game's 2014 Mountain Goat Controlled Hunt Areas.

Controlled hunt is a term used to describe a hunt with a limited number of permits, as opposed to a general season, which allows unlimited numbers of hunters. Controlled hunts are often desirable because of location and/or timing. Success rates are usually higher in controlled hunts than general season hunts. For more information visit the following websites:

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/controlledHunts/

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/hunt/rules/

Controlled Hunt Areas 2014 - Bear

24k version of Idaho Fish & Game's 2014 Bear Controlled Hunt Areas.

Controlled hunt is a term used to describe a hunt with a limited number of permits, as opposed to a general season, which allows unlimited numbers of hunters. Controlled hunts are often desirable because of location and/or timing. Success rates are usually higher in controlled hunts than general season hunts. For more information visit the following websites:

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/licenses/controlledHunts/

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/hunt/rules/