idfg-bstuder's blog

Observations and Roadkill Posters

For anyone interested in helping promote the use of these systems, here are graphics we've started with for Observations and Roadkill online reporting forms.

Observations Roadkill

 

We'd appreciate it if you are using these as web images, that they would link directly to either Observations (https://fishandgame.idaho.gov/ifwis/observations) or Roadkill (https://fishandgame.idaho.gov/ifwis/roadkill)

 

Fix for PDFs failing to download or downloading sporadically

 

Problem: PDFs downloaded from your website do not load on most client machines. Specifically happens with larger PDF files and sporadically happens across browser clients.   

Atmosphere: Windows Server 2008 R2 running IIS7.5

Cause: According to this lengthy forum post, Windows Server 2008 changes the byte order for downloaded files that Adobe reader didn't know how to read.

Solution: Apply the Windows hotfix #KB979543. Reboot required.

 

 

That pesky IE compatibility view... how to turn compatibility view off

Internet Explorer is a tricky browser to design for. I, like others, spend countless hours making my web standards pages work in IE, too. 

Here's a patch/hack/fix I applied today to fix the problem of Internet Explorer rendering my web page differently to a user with IE's compatibility view "on" than "off." Just as a note, You can tell if IE compatibility mode is on if the little page icon in the browser shows up as a solid color instead of an outline.

You might need this method applied if your site works well without compatibility view (or in webkit browsers), but does weird things due, usually, to stylesheets using conditional formatting or for html5 compatibility.

<meta content="IE=8; IE=9" http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" />

For a list of the different meta content options to include, this article was phenomal.

Make this be the first meta tag in the list of metas, otherwise IE9 won't be happy.

When the above meta tag is included in the <head> element of your page, the user is no longer presented the option to "toggle into" compatibility view. In my case, they don't need compatibility view. This is a great hack if rendering the page to work without compatibility view is not an option.

 

 

Note: This workaround won't do it for you if the user has already added your website specifically to the Compatibility View list from within IE's compatibility settings. You may have to direct them to instructions to remove it, if that's the case. But... let's face it, if they figured out how to add it to that list, then either they aren't in control (a domain policy may add the site via security settings) or they already know what they are doing and will probably google it faster than you can walk them through it.

 

 

 

Securing IFWIS Content: A migration to HTTPS (SSL) traffic

In an effort to protect your content and data, we're in process of migrating all web server traffic to https encryption. This is the same type of security that banks and agencies with sensitive data use to protect data transfer from your computer or mobile device to our web server. 

Using https helps protect data from being snooped by third parties, such as in public wifi hotspots. As a user, you won't need to make any changes. We'll redirect all traffic to these updated applications.  

SSL lockThis will be a continued migration and we'll experience a few hiccups along the way as we upgrade our applications. Occasionally you may see a warning message about "mixed content" or the secure icon that browsers show may switch to a broken lock or similar icon. These issues will disappear as we migrate. 

 

HTTPS definition from Wikipedia:

Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) is a combination of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol with the SSL/TLS protocol to provide encrypted communication and secure identification of a network web server. HTTPS connections are often used for payment transactions on the World Wide Web and for sensitive transactions in corporate information systems. [Read more at wikipedia.org]

Font problems with your ArcMap exports?

When you need to export a PDF, EMF, EPS, AI or other vectorized graphic for a report or other format, you will inevitably run into the fonts problem. Especially when collaborating.

Here's a fix for you to consider.  

When exporting your map, you click "File --> Export Map"  The following dialog appears (this one for PDF export). The options available change depending on the export type, but the options to look for typically are always available:

This screen shot is from ArcMap 10, but the properties are similar in previous versions. Look for the following checkboxes, and mark them: 

  • Embed all document fonts
    • this will keep the funny fonts you might have loaded on your machine within the document
  • Convert Marker Symbols to Polygons 
    • this makes your graphic more portable between machines with different configurations

Dialog

That's it. Your exports shouldn't give you and your collaborators a font headache if you use these steps.