Questions & Answers

Ask Fish and Game is for general questions. Not all questions are answered. Urgent questions should be directed to your nearest office.

Displaying 51 - 100 of 109 questions
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A: The definition of private land does not change.  If the land you want to hunt on is private, you must ask the landowner for permission.  If the private land is within a unit that is open for wolf hunting and the landowner okays your hunting on their land, you can hunt for wolves on the land. That ...
8/15/13
A: A hunting license is $154.75 and the wolf tag is $31.75.
7/31/13
A: Wolf tags are available and we don't limit the number we sell... The only elk tag that is completely sold out at this time (July 31, 2013) is the nonresident Sawtooth B elk tag.  The tag count of nonresident general season tags is posted on our website at https://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/ ...
7/30/13
A: Unit 4 has hunting seasons for mule deer, elk, bear, moose and wolf.  Please contact the Panhandle Region office for information about animals at 4,000 feet and the prescense of other animals.  Their number is 208-769-1414.
7/21/13
A: Please contact the Salmon Region office for that information.  Their phone number is 208-756-2271.
7/6/13
A:   We have not changed the law--there is no minimum caliber as long as you are NOT using a rimfire weapon.  (See muzzleloading equipment exception below). In any hunt, including any-weapon seasons, it is unlawful to pursue or kill big game animals: • By any means other than approved firearms, ...
7/3/13
A: There are no prohibitions in Fish and Game Code preventing you from carrying a firearm while archery hunting. Idaho does not require the wearing of hunter orange to hunt game, except: all upland game bird and upland game animal hunters are required to wear visible hunter orange (a minimum of 36 ...
6/30/13
A: Possession and Sale of Wildlife Found Dead:  Big game animal parts, such as hides, horns – except horns from bighorn sheep – bones, antlers and teeth, of deer, elk, moose, pronghorn, mountain goat, black bear, mountain lion and gray wolves that have died of natural causes, including legally ...
6/19/13
A: Possession and Sale of Wildlife Parts: Lawfully harvested wildlife parts – except edible meat from game animals – may be purchased, bartered or sold when accompanied by a written statement showing said wildlife was lawfully harvested. If black bear, mountain lion or gray wolf parts – excluding ...
6/12/13
A: You can get a regular trapping license without taking a class first, but you CANNOT trap wolves until you have taken a wolf-trapping class. 
5/28/13
A: Yes, you can carry a weapon for protection while you are hiking or looking for shed antlers.  
3/11/13
A: Yes.  The wolf tag you purchased is valid for the entire calendar year.   
3/6/13
A: Pet and livestock owners are allowed to protect their animals from molesting or attacking wolves, including the shooting of, without the need of a license or tag.  Pasted below is the Idaho Statute that provides the rights and limitations for protecting pets and livestock. (c) Control of ...
2/19/13
A: You must have a 2013 tag to hunt in 2013.  The tags (and your hunting license) expired 12-31-12.
1/29/13
A: Yes, there is a tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus, that occurs in wolves, other wild canids, and even domestic dogs, that can infect humans under some circumstances and result in Cystic Hydatid Disease. For information on this small tapeworm, the disease, and information on how to prevent ...
1/24/13
A: Although not as numerous as in the more remote areas in the Clearwater Region, wolves have been observed in parts of Latah County as well.  Most opportunities for observing or harvesting wolves can be found as one moves to the north and east away from private property and onto land managed by the ...
1/13/13
A: There is no minimum age to start trapping species classified as furbearers,  or predatory and unprotected.  Trapping can be a highly rewarding mentoring experience for older trappers to teach youngsters.  There are also Trapping Education Courses that are offered when there is enough demand.  This ...
1/12/13
A: List of Species that Can be Salvaged Big Game Animals Black Bear (Ursus americanus) California Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis californiana) Elk (Cervus canadensis) Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Moose (Alces americanus) Mountain Goat (Oreamnos americanus) Mountain Lion (Felis concolor) Mule Deer ( ...
12/26/12
A: No.  Trapping classes are not required for any other species.
12/17/12
A: Wolf tags are sold over the counter.  They are a general season tag, not a controlled hunt item.
11/22/12
A: Yes.
11/21/12
A: If the area you are hunting is approaching the harvest limit, every day you should make every reasonable effort to check whether the harvest limit is reached. It is a hunters responsibility to know the harvest limit and if it has been reached.   It is possible that a hunter may be in on a hunting ...
11/9/12
A: Possession and Sale of Wildlife Found Dead: Protected species of wildlife that have died of natural causes are generally considered property of the state and may not be possessed. But parts of big game species – hides, horns, bones, antlers, elk teeth, bear, lion and wolf parts – may be recovered ...
10/22/12
A: This is often an ethical dilemma faced by hunters. The rule states it is illegal to hunt big game with the use of bait (except for bear and wolf). Bait here is defined as something placed to attract wildlife. However, many ranchers use salt blocks to manage cattle movement within an allotment. If ...
10/10/12
A: The short answer is NO. Short range weapon seasons for big game are limited to: Shotgun using a slug or #00 or larger buckshot Muzzleloader that are .45 caliber for deer, pronghorn, mountain lion or wolf and at least .50 caliber for elk, moose, bighorn sheep, mountain goat or black bear With any ...
10/8/12
A: During a general any weapon season while using a muzzleloader You cannot use a muzzleloading rifle or musket which is less than forty-five (.45) caliber for deer, pronghorn, mountain lion, or gray wolf, or which is less than fifty (.50) caliber for elk, moose, bighorn sheep, mountain goat, or ...
9/21/12
A: Wolves are classified as a big game animal and there are a few firearms restrictions associated with the taking of big game animals. firearms, including slings, scopes or any other attachments cannot weigh more than 16 pounds With any shotgun can not use any shot smaller than double-aught (#00) ...
9/20/12
A: Yes.  Game animals, predatory wildlife and unprotect species (see list) may be salvaged. Notifying Fish and Game within 24 hours and obtaining a salvage permit within 72 hours is a legal requirement to lawfully possess salvaged wildlife.    You must report a wildlife salvage by going online to ...
9/6/12
A: Mule deer in Unit 39 typically follow the major drainages starting at the head of the South Fork, Middle Fork and North Fork Boise Rivers.  Deer found in Graham/Atlanta during summer will follow the drainages down to Boise River WMA by December/January.  Some deer following the South Fork drainage ...
8/24/12
A: Yes, you can carry both weapons while you are hunting.
8/23/12
A: Yes.  A tag purchased in January 2012 is valid through the end of 2012; you can purchase a second tag at any time you want.
7/3/12
A: No, you not required to report a mountain goat skull that you found while hiking.   For more information on the possession and sale of wildlife found dead, see page 75 of the 2012 Big Game Seasons and Rules booklet which states, “Parts of big game species – hides, horns, bones, antlers, elk teeth ...
7/2/12
A: Yes, but notifying Fish and Game within 24 hours and obtaining a free salvage permit within 72 hours is a legal requirement to lawfully possess salvaged wildlife.    Within 24 hours, you must report the wolf salvage by going online to fishandgame.idaho.gov/roadkill, which will direct you to a free ...
6/13/12
A: If you follow the salvage reporting requirements, it is legal to salvage a road-killed wolf and bleach the skull.   Within 24 hours of collecting the wolf, you must report it by going online to fishandgame.idaho.gov/roadkill, which will direct you to a self-generating permit that you can print.  A ...
6/5/12
A: The correct answer is no. The only second tag you can purchase is the second reduced tag which restricts a hunter to the special second tag units only. Please see pages 58 for bear and 63 for mountain lion.   Yes, you can.  If you are going to hunt outside the area that is included in the "reduced ...
5/28/12
A: No.  Wolves are classified as a big game animal in Idaho. The methods of take and weapons restrictions for wolves are the same as for other big game animals. For more more information, please visit IDFG's website or refer to the 2012 Big Game Seasons and Rules brochure, which also contains ...
5/25/12
A:   Idaho has licensing requirements for people who raise wolves for sale in Idaho, and has permitting requirements for importing wolves for captive possession into the state.   Idaho has licensing and tattooing requirements for holding in captivity a wolf or hybrid that exhibits primary wolf ...
5/18/12
A: The wolf season information is in the 2012 Big Game Rules book on pages 66-69.  It has been added to the deer, elk, pronghorn, bear and mountain lion season information.  
5/14/12
A: That's a suggestion that hasn't been considered to date.  High cost of tags is one of three reasons nonresident hunters gave us for no longer coming to Idaho to hunt (wolf impacts on elk and the economy were the other two reasons cited in a 2009 survey).  Charging two or three times more for a ...
4/18/12
A: In recent years wolf numbers were increasing at about 15% per year in absence of hunting. Primary source of mortality was depredation control. In absence of that, perhaps 20% or so. Population Growth rate would slow as food availability became limited (numbers would not continue to grow ...
4/11/12
A: The agenda for the Wildlife Summit is still being developed.  The challenge of the Summit is to bring together diverse wildlife interests to foster common understanding.  Attendees will have an opportunity to express opinions on various issues.  In 1938, Idahoans came together and created the Fish ...
4/9/12
A: While the Wildlife Summit will focus on the future of Idaho wildlife management in general, there will be  time during the "Idaho Cafe" segment when participants can discuss specific issues and concerns.  Wolf conflicts could very likely come up.  The Idaho Cafe is designed so that people can ...
4/9/12
A: The Idaho legislature added a wolf tag to the Sportsman's Package in its 2012 session.  It will not be available until July 1, 2012.  We haven't determined the price of the package when the wolf tag is added. The tag will not be retroactive; that is, if the pack was purchased before July 1, you ...
4/3/12
A: Notifying Fish and Game within 24 hours and obtaining a salvage permit within 72 hours is a legal requirement to lawfully possess salvaged wildlife.    Within 24 hours, you must report a wildlife salvage by going online to http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/roadkill, which will direct you to a self- ...
4/3/12
A: Yes, the 2012 Idaho Legislature added a wolf tag to the Sportsman's Package; it will become part of the Package beginning July 1, 2012.
4/3/12
A: The Idaho Fish and Game Commission and the Department of Fish and Game listed the wolf as a big game animal.  It is our intent to manage wolves responsibly, primarily through hunting seasons, just like we manage other big game species.
3/20/12
A: You might begin by looking at "The Compass" Idaho Fish and Game's 15 year strategic plan, which is posted on the Idaho Fish and Game website under the "About Us" tab.  Developed and implemented in 2005, The Compass lays out four goals:  sustain Idaho's fish and wildlife and the habitats upon which ...
3/16/12
A: There is information on our website at http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/wildlife/?getPage=209 about one of the most common wolf diseases.    A wolf was recently found that died of parvovirus (similar to the parvo that effects domestic dogs).   If we suspect that a wolf's death is from disease a ...
3/15/12
A: None of the carcasses of 14 wolves killed in the aerial control operation in February were retrieved. All were killed in remote areas and were from the ground without great difficulty. In the past we have retrieved most carcasses of wolves killed on the highway or killed as part of control actions ...
3/2/12
A: When safe and practical, carcasses are recovered and DNA and other biological samples are collected. Some carcasses are sent to the Idaho Fish & Game Wildlife Health Lab for necropsy and disease testing.
2/29/12