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Recent Articles: Clearwater

Wild Turkey Cutlets by Chef Randy King

April 13, 2014 - 10:16pm -- idfg-vosborn
Wild Turkey Cutlets

Once you harvest your turkey, the next step is preparing the meat and cooking up a great wild meal. Idaho chef, Randy King, not only has turkey recipes to try, but also tips on how to prepare turkey meat to get the best taste and texture from your bird.

For the spring turkey hunt, King offers up a recipe for Wild Turkey Cutlets. For other wild meat preparations, see Chef King’s website: http://chefrandyking.com/

Let's Talk Turkey

The total mass of a turkey is always surprising to me. I shoot other big birds like geese and sage hen often but a turkey is just a totally different ball game, and as such needs to be treated that way.

Turkeys consist of 5 cuts of meat in total: the breast, the tenderloin, the wings, the thighs and the drumsticks. Each of these bird parts beg for a separate cooking method. It is not wise to just roast a wild turkey like a butterball. The breast will probably be dry, the drumsticks will be good for dog chew toys and the thigh meat will require a steak knife.

This month I will concentrate on the breast meat of a turkey, by far the biggest bang for the buck.

Turkey breast meat is not as soft and juicy as store bought, but it has a ton more flavor. Think elk meat vs. beef – similar but still different. But like store bought meat it still needs cooked to 165 degrees to be safe to eat. Be careful when cooking meat to this temperature, it can be very dry. To avoid dry meat make sure to remove it from heat a whole 10 degrees before it reaches 165 degrees on the inside. Carry over cooking will finish the job of getting the meat to 165.

Breaded Turkey Cutlets with Oil Poached Garlic and Tomatoes served with Pan Roasted Orange

This recipe calls for turkey “cutlets” AKA  slices of turkey breast. Lay your breast out on the counter. It will make half of a heart shape. Cut across the grain of the meat in about ¼ inch sections. You will get quite a few. It is even a little easier to cut when the meat is frozen a little.

Take those slices and place them between two sheets of clear plastic film about an inch from each other. Use a mallet or the bottom of a pan to hammer the slices into almost see through thin sections. You now have turkey “cutlets” and they are a transformed piece of wild game meat. Bread them and fry them, add a squeeze of lemon, and you have the German classic schnitzel. And that classic dish is what we are having fun with today. Replace the sour lemon with a sweeter caramelized orange and add the roasted garlic and tomatoes – bang – a whole new take on a classic.

Oil Poached Garlic and Tomatoes

Weekend Survey on Clearwater and Little Salmon 4/5/2014

April 13, 2014 - 9:59pm -- idfg-vosborn

The Little Salmon River and the South Fork Clearwater were a busy fishery over the weekend and catch rates were very good. Fish and Game has discontinued monitoring the Main Clearwater River due to minimal angler effort.  Effort observed on the Main Salmon River was also minimal.  Click here for more details - Amanda Schmidt, Fisheries Technician

Clearwater Anglers Can Keep the Big Ones.

March 26, 2014 - 11:46am -- idfg-vosborn

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission voted unanimously to lift the restrictions on harvest of “B-run” steelhead on the Clearwater River for the remainder of the 2014 season effective immediately. The decision was made during the commission meeting on Thursday, March 20, 2014. 

“B-run” steelhead are those that spend two years in the ocean as opposed to “A-run” steelhead which typically return to Idaho after only one year in the ocean. Prior to this change, anglers on the Clearwater River were only allowed to keep steelhead between 20 and 28 inches in length. The change will allow those anglers to keep steelhead longer than 28 inches as long as they have evidence of a clipped adipose fin. The daily bag limit of 1 and the possession limit of 2 remain the same on the Clearwater River for the remainder of the 2014 spring season.

 

Weekend Creel Survey for Clearwater 3/23/14

March 26, 2014 - 11:37am -- idfg-vosborn

The busiest area this past weekend in the region was on the South Fork of the Clearwater (river sect 07). Hours per fish caught was only 4 hours, which resulted in really good fishing. Many anglers chose to release a lot of the hatchery fish they caught, which resulted in higher hours per fish kept.  Effort has continued to drop on the main stem of the Clearwater. The Little Salmon also had a lot of anglers on it this past weekend and had some pretty could catch rates. Click here for more details. Over all the weather was nice and the water was clearer than the previous weekend.  - Jaime Robertson. Fisheries Technician

Clearwater & Snake Rivers Weekend Report for 3/8/2014

March 11, 2014 - 12:41pm -- idfg-vosborn

The Snake River is showing really good catch rates and good water clarity but, it had very little effort this weekend. This past week, the Clearwater and Salmon rivers were running high with rain and snow melt causing the water clarity to be poor and it made fishing difficult. River section 03 mouth of Clearwater to Orofino bridge had no documented anglers and fishing effort was low during the week as well. It looks like some of the shore effort moved over to the North Fork of the Clearwater for somewhat clearer water.  If you get onto the USGS site and look at the water conditions around Stites on the South Fork of the Clearwater it does look as if the water level is peaking so hopefully water conditions will improve within the near future and make for better fishing. Click here for more details.

Photo from Lindsey Bischoff shows spring runoff affecting the North Fork of the Clearwater above Dworshak Dam.

- Jaime Robertson, Fisheries Technician

 

 

Upper Salmon River Steelhead Weekend Report 3/02/14

March 4, 2014 - 3:32pm -- idfg-vosborn

This past weekend, road conditions improved enough below North Fork for creel personnel to collect data from all location codes on the upper Salmon River. Anglers in location code 14, downstream of the Middle Fork, averaged 5 hours per steelhead caught and 10 hours per steelhead kept. Effort was minimal and no steelhead were observed caught in location code 15. Location code 16 received the most angler effort over the weekend, and anglers there averaged 49 hours per steelhead caught and 147 per steelhead kept. Anglers in location code 17, from the mouth of the Lemhi River to the mouth of the Pahsimeroi River, averaged 9 hours per steelhead caught and 15 hours per steelhead kept. Similar to last week, angler effort was low upstream of Ellis. The few interviews that were obtained from upstream produced averages of 8 hours per steelhead caught in location code 18 and 17 hours per steelhead caught, or kept, in location code 19.  Click here for complete summary.

The Deadwater ice jam has receded back to Deadwater. With warmer weather in the forecast, it may go out within the week. Water conditions downstream of Deadwater remained muddy throughout the weekend, with visibility around 18 inches. Additionally, all boat ramps between Salmon and North Fork have been cleared of ice, with the exception of the 4th of July Access Area. - Brent Beller, Fisheries Technician

Steelhead Fishing on the Clearwater 2/11/13

February 13, 2014 - 12:46pm -- idfg-vosborn

This past week the Clearwater Region saw almost a foot of snow or more in some areas. As a result Idaho Fish & Games weekend creel survey did not document any anglers on the South Fork of the Clearwater, Hells Canyon Dam and Salmon River.  Lewiston Tribune reporter, Eric Barker, recently reported that weather and other events are keeping many anglers off the rivers, but for those who are willing to face them have experienced some good fishing at times....

Steelhead surprise on the Clearwater: Die-hard anglers seeing decent catch as crowds stay off the Clearwater and the big fish stick around.

Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 12:00 am |  Updated: 7:20 am, Fri Feb 7, 2014.  

By ERIC BARKER of the Lewiston Morning Tribune 

Steelhead anglers fishing the Clearwater River have seen restrictive regulations, low bag limits and a disappointing return of B-run fish this fall and winter.

Those conditions have kept efforts low, but anglers willing to face them have experienced some darn good fishing at times.

"You basically have the river to yourself," said Andy Alldredge of Camp, Cabin and Home in Lewiston. "There is plenty of fish around."

The Clearwater, especially the stretch between Lewiston and Orofino, is not the best place to go for those looking to take home a steelhead. Special regulations aimed at ensuring there are enough steelhead for spawning at hatcheries, restrict harvest to fish that are no more than 28 inches long. That has led to some funny-looking harvest statistics.

For example, last weekend anglers on the Lewiston-to-Orofino stretch of the Clearwater landed a steelhead for every six hours of fishing. That's about as good as it gets there. But anglers had to put in 56 hours for every keeper.

"The catching is very good, I would say it's as good as it is in good years. The harvest rates are way down because you can't harvest the big fish," said Joe DuPont, regional fisheries manager for the department at Lewiston. "The reason the catch rates are so good is the effort is very low and the big fish stay out there. We are not cropping (big) hatchery fish, and there is not a lot of competition."

Don Whitney, another Fish and Game biologist, said he and the creel clerks who work for him have heard few complaints from anglers about the harvest restrictions.

"It seems like people understand the restrictions, that if we don't have the brood, we can't release the smolt."

Hatchery fish are in the system so anglers can catch them. But the system depends on enough fish escaping the fisheries and returning to hatcheries so the next generation of fish can be produced.

Normally that is not a problem. In fact, fisheries managers often fret that too many hatchery fish remain left uncaught and that they could pose a threat to protected wild steelhead by breeding with them and reducing the fitness of their offspring.

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