Recent Blogs

Clearwater Steelhead Fishing Report 2/17/15

As stream flows began to decline the past week, angling effort increased and produced some great catch rates through the region on the Clearwater, Snake and Salmon Rivers.

Most of the success on the Clearwater River downstream of Orofino occurred just below the mouth of the North Fork and above the mouth of the North Fork near the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery.  

The North Fork of the Clearwater was a popular fishing area and some anglers did exceptionally well. Inconsistent catch rates may have been contributed to the increased flows released from Dworshak Dam.

Angler effort and success picked up on the South Fork of the Clearwater over the weekend. The best catch rates were observed below the Mt. Idaho grade and near the town of Harpster.

In the lower Salmon River drainage, the best catch rates were observed on the Little Salmon River.

Anglers who were contacted on the Snake River were fishing at the tail race below Hells Canyon Dam. Got to Harvest Results for more detials.  - Amanda Schmidt,Fisheries Technician, Idaho Fish & Game

 

Live Chat (Archive) - 2015 Big Game Seasons Proposals

You're welcome to review our March 4 Live Chat on this page. This live chat served as one additional opportunity for sportsmen to comment for the 2015 Big Game season proposals.

All of Idaho's Big Game managers from across the state answered your questions.  

The you can still comment on the proposals in the 2015 Season Proposals for each region through March 8. The next comment opportunity will be at the March 23rd public hearing to the Idaho Fish and Game Commisison.

 

Thank you to all who participated!
 

Live Blog 2015 Big Game Season Proposals (Evening Session)
 
 
Review this Afternoon's Chat Event
Live Blog 2015 Big Game Season Proposals (Afternoon Session)
 
Chat Guidelines

In general, for your post to be approved, please follow these simple guidelines: Be respectful. Stay constructive. Stay on topic. No objectionable language.

Comments that violate these guidelines generally will not be made public. You participate at your own risk, and take personal responsibility for your comments, your username, and any information provided.

Ice Fishing Report - Cascade Reservoir Feb 12, 2015

If you're a bird watcher this week's report might just make you happy. With all the open water on Cascade there has been a plethora of waterfowl visiting the area, lots of ducks, geese, and swans. If you're an ice fisherman the outlook isn't so optimistic. With all the warm and wet weather we've been experiencing this past week the ice on cascade has gone for the wayside. The south end of the lake I would deem not safe. Besides the large open water gap between the bank and the ice itself there lies many more problems throughout the southern end of the lake. These problems would include but are not limited to large areas of open water, large cracks with open water gaps between them, and some rotten ice.  With that being said I cannot say that anyone should attempt to fish on cascade south of Sugarloaf Island.  This includes all the way from sugarloaf to the town of cascade.   I have attached a few photos that I took today of Ice conditions on the southern end of the lake. 

Now that we’re done being pessimistic, the north end of the lake continues to be fishable, with one exception.  That exception is finding a spot to access the ice.  With the influx of water from the thaw the level of the reservoir has increased causing the ice to pull away from the shore.  Along with this the ice closest to shore is still fairly weak and soft.  But if you can find your way onto the ice things are looking good.  The ice depth around poison creek were still 6-7” of solid ice.  There was a few places that you can actually access the ice around poison creek and the surrounding area.  The area around boulder creek I wasn’t able to find a place that I could access the ice without going over the top of my boots and getting wet.  If you’re a diehard ice fisherman and need to get that last little bit of fishing in the north end is where it can happen.  With that being said extreme caution should be used especially right now with warm temperatures and thawing ice. 

I guess I could mention that fishing still has continued to be fairly slow with those that have made it out on the ice.  There seems to be a greater ratio of big to small fish but the overall number of fish being caught is fairly low. 

DP - We lost two anglers on Winchester Lake this past week when they fell through the ice.  Please be careful and if there's a doubt - save yourself to fish another day.

 

 

Ranchers Work to Restore Wetlands

Wetland restoration on the Granger Ranches in Montana's Madison Valley shows how conservation can benefit agriculture, communities and economies. Jeff Laszlo tells the story of how a multi-partnership project on his family's ranch increased species diversity while benefiting the ranch's bottom line. Ditched and drained in the past, the ranch now hosts vibrant wetlands and at least fifteen species of concern, including Trumpeter Swans

Clearwater Steelhead Fishing Report 2/8/15

Fishing conditions and catch rates on the Clearwater River downstream from Orofino were good during the week but diminished over the weekend. On Saturday, cloudy water conditions were observed and water clarity decreased as water levels began to rise. By Sunday afternoon and the river flows reached 22,900 cubic feet per second causing swift and muddy water conditions with floating debris. The North Fork of the Clearwater was the most popular and productive fishing area over the weekend for both boat and shore anglers who were avoiding the muddy water conditions on the mainstem. On Sunday morning, approximately 100 anglers were observed fishing on the North Fork by IDFG personnel. The South Fork of the Clearwater was not monitored during the week, but anglers reported that they had caught more fish during the week days before water conditions began to become less favorable over the weekend. Saturday afternoon, flows on the South Fork began to rise and on Sunday water conditions were high and muddy. The majority of success over the weekend occurred as high upstream as the Mt. Idaho grade. Very little effort was observed on the Salmon River downstream of Riggins over the weekend due to the high muddy flow coming from the Little Salmon River. Most of the effort occurred above the mouth of the Little Salmon in river locations 12 and 13. A majority of the anglers checked from location 13 were anglers on guided trips. - Amanda Schmidt. Fisheries Technician, Idaho Fish & Game Clearwater Region

Boise River Temporarily Goes Dry!

Earlier this week, the Boise River had some water issues. Or no water at all, in places. This was due to an equipment failure at Barber dam.

We've had several concerns about effects to fish in the Boise River due to this.

Our biologists are investigating the issue and have written a description of what they look for to make sure the fish stay happy in the beautiful Boise River.

Section of Boise River Goes Dry

Aerial photo of Barber Dam. Courtesy of Thunderhammer3000 at Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/72237776@N00/2840997805

by Joe Kozfkay, Regional Fisheries Manager

On Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning, February 3rd and 4th 2015, a series of unfortunate occurrences at east Boise’s Barber Dam (owned by Ada County and operated by Enel Green Power) caused Boise River flows to drop to zero for a period of seven hours.

Maintenance activities are being performed on the dam’s spillway, and to ensure construction crew safety, Barber Pool is being held at less than full pool levels, with all river flows being routed through one turbine. Unfortunately, the gate that allowed water to reach this turbine closed Tuesday night and alarm systems failed. Upstream flows were then caught in Barber Pool, until the point where the pool was refilled and additional water began cresting the dam’s spillway.

During the seven-hour period of zero cubic feet per second river flow over or through Barber Dam, several miles of the Boise River were de-watered or did not receive the “normal” wintertime minimum flow of 240 cubic feet of water per second. Very few people saw the river in this condition as it occurred in the middle of the night. From a fish habitat standpoint, riffles and run habitats were likely severely de-watered, whereas pool habitat likely retained water. Farther downstream areas were less impacted as infiltration of groundwater re-wetted the river channel.

Winter is a critical period for many aquatic species. Dramatic river flow reductions can have negative impacts on aquatic organisms such as fish and invertebrates. Fish survive the winter by reducing activity levels and seeking habitat where they can avoid expending energy while at the same time avoiding predators. This is especially true for young trout. The Boise River possesses wild, spring-spawning rainbow trout and wild, fall-spawning brown trout. Young rainbow trout reside on the river’ edges, usually near downed wood or other cover. A rapid drop in river level may force young rainbow trout to seek alternative cover and become susceptible to predators. It may also cause stranding and death.

For the most part, brown trout spawn throughout the month of November. Boise River water temperatures result in an approximate 60-day brown trout egg incubation period. In early February, young brown trout are just beginning to hatch or have just recently done so. At this critical life stage, water level drops are known to cause brown trout mortality. Other fish species also reside in riffles and near shore areas and may have been affected by the dramatic drop in river flow, including sculpin, dace, and whitefish.

Idaho Fish and Game crews conducted visual surveys of this river segment on Wednesday afternoon, February 4th. No dead adult fish were observed, which was a positive sign. Measurement of potential impacts to young trout and other species are only beginning and will be much more difficult to determine. Crews are at the river today, sampling riffle and river margin areas in the de-watered area and in downstream reaches to make a relative comparison. This should provide some information on possible impacts of the de-watering event.

Other types of suspected impacts may not be readily measured, especially for young trout, non-game fish, or invertebrate numbers and species. Based on the results of these and subsequent surveys, Fish and Game staff will determine whether appropriate mitigation should be pursued from responsible parties.